6 Key Thoughts Along The Fundraising Journey (No5)

Investor Contact – A One-Hit Pitch or Contact, Not an Unfolding Mystery

(Image Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.Net)

“You get one shot so make sure it’s your best. Be prepared, be focused and be thorough. “

A frequent frustration when receiving incoming investment enquiries (either for the angel network I run, or for me as an independent fundraiser) is when the enquiry is drip-fed or trickles across the internet to me via a string of emails. The most common contact or access into angel finance tends to be via ‘pitching events.’ However, company founders also seek out investors directly where the first point of contact would be by email or a message via LinkedIn. The problem is that these digital introductions can be a very time consuming experience for those on the receiving end. You may not like it but you will be sifted and most likely moved on quite quickly (hopefully politely) so that the next business propositions can be reviewed. Remember, investors are looking for the best of the bunch, as soon as they see the investment opportunity, if it’s not in the top bracket, then they need to drop it quickly and move on.

Bad scenario #1:  An incoming email with either, i) a 30+ page business plan, or ii) a 15+ page powerpoint pitch deck. My reply, “Dear founder, would you mind sending me an executive summary or a short 1 or 2 page overview of your proposition. If you don’t have one, please see the attached example (N.B. I often send out an executive summary template). I’m afraid I wouldn’t get my work done if I had to read business plans all day long.” The normal review and sift process takes about 20-30 seconds (similar to a HR recruiter), therefore don’t make the reader work hard or reject you just for providing too much information. Yes it’s true, at this stage it is possible to provide too much information.

Bad Scenario #2:  Incoming email with an attachment but with an explanation that “the financials are not quite ready but I’ll email them over later in the week,” or, “I’m waiting for the result of a really big deal. I’ll keep you posted as things become clearer.” Don’t assume that the reader will remember you or your business proposition when you next email or call them. Many investors and investing groups can get anywhere between 10-30 investment propositions a week.

The best advice I often give out is in focusing companies on how to make a decent executive summary. This summary is so important because it’s your foot in the door. Be unfocused in this and it will lead the reader to suspect that if you can’t write a half decent 1 or 2 page executive summary, then it’s quite likely that the same focus and attention to detail is likely to be seen in every aspect of the business and its associated business plan. The problem with many summaries is that they max out on market aspects and also on product/service information but with very little on the investment proposition being offered to investors. They frequently fail to address the main required question: “how are you going to make money for an investor and what can you show to support this?”

Take a look at some of the summaries in the ‘Deal Activity’ section of this blog. I find this format seems to cover most of the urgent things you should communicate to an investor.

Your feedback and comments to this article, as ever, are always appreciated.

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About Aristos Peters
I work rest and play in the digital space, with particular interest in digital startup companies and their need for seed, angel and VC investment. As a NED, I have worked with several start-ups, taking them through funding rounds and also work on investment acceleration and business growth helping companies to become investment ready. Currently about to launch the startup fundraising app D RISK IT (www.drisk.it).

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