Why is Fundraising So Hard? (Part 1)

cashAre you Fundraising? Have you considered what you would do if your fundraising was not successful? 

As over 95% of startups fail in their fundraising attempts, surely this is a key question to consider before you consider stepping out.

So, you feel that you have a good deal to take to investors. You’ve spruced up your pitch deck and seemingly crafted a half decent executive summary and business plan. However, after pitching to investors for 6 months, the best bites you have received have been minor questions from a couple of supposed investors, who were just really tyre kickers and consultants pretending to be investors who were looking for fee based work. No one has seemed remotely determined to enter into a deal conversation, let alone make you an offer. This has invariably led you to ask questions; “is it me, is my pitching/presenting not good enough, am I saying something wrong, do they not believe in the opportunity, the space, the team, the product,” etc and of course the list goes on and on. Perhaps you’ve been fortunate to even get a partial offer but unless its a significant majority of the amount originally asked for (say at least 60%), you’ve still probably failed and won’t be able to proceed, even with a partial raise. When it gets to 6 months with no firm full investment interest, you need to be taking a long hard stare in the mirror. As Sir Alex Ferguson infamously said, “It’s squeaky bum time.”

Stress-testing

One of the main reasons that I believe makes fundraising hard for most is the lack of time founders spend ‘stress-testing’ their investment proposition / deal. What do I mean stress-testing? Well, just running it past one or two people who know what they are doing and who might have some spare time to spread a critical eye over your deal before you take it out. Be prepared though if they suggest some changes that are not quick to implement, such as, get a bit more traction or complete development before you go asking for development – these things can take time. The app D RISK IT (www.drisk.it) should help with stress-testing somewhat when it is released in September.

Two reasons why stress-testing doesn’t happen …. (i) Time. It can take around 6 months. There is a misguided belief that you just ‘write up’ your deal and take it out on the road. Also, (ii) Money. There’s an unhelpful aversion to paying for help. I know most startups have little spare money to help them hunt bigger money but focusing solely on a ‘free’ only strategy is not a great way to advance in business. Free is ok when it’s digital but it’s human equivalent (i.e. fee) is not based on the revenue models that the digital freemium model is. Just as software-as-a-service has a fee ticket association, why shouldn’t consultancy, development or fundraising-as-a-service? Another reason that fundraising is hard is that ‘success fee’ only professionals would rather minimise their risk by working on larger deals that are at a later stage of development, preferably post-revenue. So they rarely accept a request to fundraise from a revenue startup unless they are totally hot. Most think they are but they are not, so the source of help moves on to a bigger more juicy and importantly, ‘traction laden’ opportunity.

As a founder, if you’re not a fundraising expect, what should you do? Obviously, get some help. If you can get it free, then fine, otherwise pay for it. Someone, said to me a long time ago, “it costs money to get money.” Don’t make the mistake of think it’s just a case of writing up your executive summary then going knocking on the door of as many angels as you can find.

So, what to do? …. Well, there is some good news in Part 2, coming soon.

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